Glossary of energy terms

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Main disconnecting point (HRM)

A device necessary for quick disconnection of electric current from the distribution system. The goal is to ensure the safe maintenance, repair or replacement of electrical equipment. HRM is an important part of network protection in photovoltaic systems, where it serves to remove production from the distribution system in the event of a malfunction or any issues that could threaten the stability of the network.

Maximum reserved capacity (MRC)

At voltage level VHV and HV (very high voltage, high voltage), it is the maximum volume of electricity that delivery point can consume from the power grid. More precisely, it is the average value of the quarter-hourly active power negotiated in the contract for connection to the distribution system, or determined in the connection conditions for one delivery point. The MRC at the low voltage (LV) level is determined by the amperage value of the main circuit breaker in front of the electricity meter or the value of the MRC in kilowatts converted into electric current in amperes negotiated in the contract for connection to the distribution system, or determined in the connection conditions for one delivery point.
SOURCE: https://www.zsdis.sk

Measurement and regulation (MaR)

A system that ensures the control and smooth performance of operating technologies such as heating, ventilation, air conditioning, cooling or lighting for the delivery point. MaR manages comfort, safety, technology management, monitoring and, last but not least, the optimization of energy consumption.

Micro-blackouts

Micro-blackouts, also known as micro-abortions, are brief interruptions in the power supply that usually last less than one second. These outages can be caused by a variety of factors, including distribution network problems, atmospheric influences, accidents, or rapid changes in electricity consumption.

Although micro-blackouts are brief, they can cause significant problems in sensitive electronic systems such as computers, data centers, or medical devices. Therefore, it is often necessary to use backup power supplies or power interruption protection systems to minimize potential damage or interruptions in operation.